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maxon motor Australia – COVID-19

Medical Industry prioritisation and emergency sector fast turnaround markets.

During the extraordinary and challenging times the COVID-19 virus has brought about, maxon motor Australia would like to extend our wishes of good health to all customers, staff and suppliers.

In response to the corona virus outbreak maxon group have established a task force to help address the many challenges including staff isolation, continuance of supply, logistics and most importantly the service and delivery to our important medical industry customers.

maxon group supply high end medical products across a broad range of hospital applications, and most importantly at this time, life-saving medical ventilators. As such maxon have established a fast track for medical and associated critically important applications. We would like to ask any customers in this category that we have not already been in contact with and are experiencing hyperactivity on demand or forecasts, to please register this with our staff. maxon would like to prioritise raw material and production capabilities around medical applications first. Our supply chain and production sites are flexible, adaptable and reliable.

For more information or to get in touch contact maxon motor Australia tel. +61 2 9457 7477.

© 2020 by maxon motor Australia

One year to go to the 36th America’s Cup presented by Prada.

A year from today, anybody following the America’s Cup closely will be tuning in with one question in mind: “Who’s got it right?” It’s a universal truth in America’s Cup competition, a question that’s been asked since the original match in 1851.

There is an inescapable, unavoidable, nerve-racking moment in every Cup, the moment when years of planning, scheming, designing, building, and training lay behind you, and the day finally arrives, the day when all that’s left to do is go out and race, to find out whether you got it right.

The experience will either be bitter, or sweet, depending on how well you and the 100-plus people in your team have fared sweating the small stuff, trying to out-think and out-fox your opposition. It’s not uncommon for four years to go by between AC contests, but a team’s worst fears can be realised within moments of coming off the start-line for the first time in the AC Match, meaning a long summer lies ahead if you’re found wanting.

“It’s a unique moment in every America’s Cup, part of the event’s DNA,” says Emirates Team New Zealand boss, Grant Dalton. “The moment when sailors, designers, fans, commentators – everybody really – get the answer to the same question, at exactly the same time, when the Challenger meets the Defender on the start line for the very first finals race, The boats come off the line, foot flat, and we all get a first, good look at whether one has an edge over the other. A classic America’s Cup moment.”

Few sports deliver such a potentially delicious, yet terrifying cocktail of pressure and intrigue, and this time, it’s all by design, a rare phase in Cup history in which a new class rolls out of the shed.

“When we developed the class rule, we really wanted it to be quite open,” says Emirates Team New Zealand’s Head of Design, Dan Bernasconi, who helped dream up the radical AC75. “We wanted to allow space for innovation and space for different teams to design different hull shapes, different ways of controlling the sails, different foils and rudders. So designers have a much bigger area in which to play. And so as engineers, we love that, it’s great. And when each team launched their first boats, we saw exactly that, but we’ll find out who’s got it right.”

Get it right, that’s one hell of a confidence booster for any Cup outfit going into the biggest race of their lives.

“The America’s Cup is the pinnacle of sailing, really, so to be in that position to be racing for the Cup, that’s an incredible opportunity,” says INEOS Team UK skipper, Sir Ben Ainslie. “There’s always a lot of pressure but if you enjoy that kind of thing then there’s no better platform in the sport of sailing.”

It’s a moment when you discover precisely where you stand as a competitor, whether the hundreds of thousands of small, yet big, decisions over the preceding two, three, even four years of design and build have amounted to a boat that’s capable of beating the opposition.

“You’re definitely aware of the enormity of it, and we also quite enjoy the pressure that comes with it,” adds Emirates Team New Zealand helm, Peter Burling. “In our sport there are lots of different things that bring pressure and add to the occasion and that’s all part of the fun of what we do.

“When it actually comes to the first race it’s your first chance to really see how things have shaped up over the four years of development and I think that’s one of the really exciting aspects of the America’s Cup, when so many things come together at the end. It’s four years of hard work for, in our case, over a hundred people so it’s a pretty amazing challenge.”

The warning signal of the America’s Cup, like any warning signal of any race, is a moment of tension,” adds Francesco Bruni, of Luna Rossa Prada Pirelli, the Italian Challenger of Record. “You have to keep yourself focused on the important things and try to think only about the race and nothing else to perform at the best, and it’s going to be a great feeling to be on the start-line in Auckland, one year from now, something I’m really looking forward to.”

For the teams, today, 12-months out from that moment, time’s disappearing fast as all four outfits race to lock in final designs for boat two, at the same time making the most of every single moment remaining to prepare their boat and themselves for one of the rarest opportunities in sport.

“How we approach our racing is that whether we’re sailing around Pensacola Bay by ourselves, or racing day one of the match, each day should feel the same,” says NYYC American Magic team head, Terry Hutchinson, a veteran campaigner who experienced this moment for himself back in Valencia, Spain, in 2007.

“I’ll be making sure I give the relevant information to Dean, Paul and Andrew about the best strategy for the race and I’ll be in the position that I need to be in to execute on the day.”

But all the teams will get the chance to test their mettle at the first America’s Cup World Series regatta in Cagliari, Sardegna, April 23-26. It’s another rare AC milestone, the first time that the new AC75 class yachts will meet to race. There, we’ll all get a first glimpse of who’s getting it right, or getting it wrong, a crucial opportunity for the teams to get the measure of one another out where it matters, on the water.

Cagliari, followed by Portsmouth (June 4-7) then Auckland (December 17-20), will be equally nerve-racking, given the teams will already be largely committed and building their 2021 boat, but who knows what each has in store for one another come next summer in the southern hemisphere. That’s all work in progress.

But what of the boat itself, what can we expect from it, the AC75, making its debut?

“This boat’s a real beast. It’s the best way to put it,” says Emirates Team New Zealand crew, Blair Tuke. “It’s a step on aerodynamically to the AC50 from Bermuda, a very powerful boat, more than what we’ve raced before and that leads to some pretty fast speeds, especially upwind. But, where we’re at right now is by no means where all the teams are going to be at next year. It’s going to be a different push on to go to that next level.”

The day is coming when there is no holding back, no reining in, a day when everything will be on show, because every win, and every point, is vital. That day – March 6, 2021 –  is a year from today.

maxon Group tel. +61 2 9457 7477.

maxon Group is an Official Supplier to Emirates Team New Zealand. We follow the progress of their journey as Defender in the 36th America’s Cup campaign, March 2021.

 

maxon’s Ceramic department.

Ceramic can be used where other materials fail. The advantages of using this customisable component is found in its mechanical strength, exceptional insulation properties, high resistance to corrosion, ability to withstand extreme temperatures and chemicals, durability and wear-resistant properties.

At their state of the art manufacturing site in Sexau, Germany, maxon Group develops customisable CIM (Ceramic Injection Moulding) components. Working with the latest technology and incorporating the 20 plus years of experience in Powder Injection Moulding (PIM) maxon uses the most up to date CAD technology and finite element calculation.

The ceramic department works across technology found in watches and mechanical clocks, measurement technology such as sensor housing for flow meters, audio equipment including headphones and bearings for high-end record players, industrial automation and machinery, medical industry for example in Endoscopes, and of course, DC motors.

In DC motor technology, the limitations of traditional materials become evident where environmental conditions are extreme. Ceramic is particularly suited to the harsh conditions found in salt water.  For example customised underwater drives require saltwater resistant materials. maxon ceramic spindles work with virtually no slip-stick effect, are corrosion resistant, robust, wear resistant and have excellent efficiency.

For more information visit the maxon ceramic page

maxon motor Australia tel. +61 2 9457 7477.

Brushless DC motors for the oil & gas sector

The recovery of natural gas and petroleum requires constant innovation and updated technology. The technology used for deep drilling processes are exposed to extreme environmental conditions. Temperatures of 200+°C, high pressure and extreme shock and vibration. Brushless DC motor technology from maxon Group is found in various drilling applications, hydraulic valve control, communication mechanisms and measuring instrumentation.

Read more on maxon Group Australia’s website or call +61 2 9457 7477.

 

Match conditions confirmed for the America’s Cup match and dates announced for Prada Cup.

Following a successful mediation, the America’s Cup Defender and Challenger of Record have come to an agreement on the Match Conditions for the 36th America’s Cup presented by Prada.

The two sides came to a consensus after engaging in an official mediation process run by the America’s Cup Arbitration panel chairman David Tillett (AUS).

As part of the agreement, the wind range for racing in the America’s Cup Match will be 6.5 to 23 knots.

The agreed racing schedule for the America’s Cup Match has two races per day planned for March 6,7,10, 12, 13, 14 and 15. Additional reserve days have been scheduled but the intention is to complete the event on the weekend of March 13/14, weather permitting. Racing is planned from 4pm onwards each race day. The winner of the America’s Cup Match will be the first team to score seven points.

The parties also agreed on certain conditions in respect of the Prada Cup due to be issued by June 30 2020. The racing will consist of four Round Robin sessions over January 15, 16, 17, 22, 23, and 24, followed by a repêchage round over January 29, 30, 31, and February 2, with the first-to-seven-points Prada Cup Final taking place over February 13, 14, 17, 19, 20, 21, 22.

The following wind range for racing has been agreed:

Round Robins and Repêchage:           6.5 to 21 knots

Prada Cup Final:                                    6.5 to 23 knots.

In addition the parties also confirmed Course Location Guidelines for the Race Director when selecting the Auckland racecourse locations for all the Auckland events including the Match for the 36th America’s Cup presented by Prada.

To view the Settlement Memorandum click here.

The first competitive action of the 36th America’s Cup presented by Prada will be in Cagliari, Sardinia from April 23 – 26 at the first of three ACWS regattas taking place during 2020. Further ACWS events will be held in Portsmouth, England on June 4 – 7, and in Auckland, New Zealand in December 17 – 20.

maxon Group tel. +61 2 9457 7477.

maxon Group is an Official Supplier to Emirates Team New Zealand.

One year on: maxon supports Emirates Team New Zealand.

It’s been one year since maxon jumped onboard as an Official Supplier to Emirates Team New Zealand.

maxon are proud to have been working closely with Emirates Team New Zealand’s design and engineering team for more than one year providing advice on integrated drive solutions. Looking back a lot has happened in this short time. The team led the way in innovation, designing the system that all the teams use to raise and lower the foils, and pushed the boundaries of technology to build the new concept AC75 yacht using only simulation and not prototypes for testing. With work underway on the second AC75, Emirates Team New Zealand’s spirit for continuous improvement and blue-sky thinking aligns with maxon’s passion and motivation to excel in technology. maxon was excited to see Te Aihe gliding over the water on a recent test run. The AC75 is constantly pushing the boundaries of technology with the use of maxon DC motors and drive systems.

maxon Group Australian Managing Director Brett Motum said “our DC motors are perfectly suited for wherever extreme precision and the highest quality standards are necessary and where compromises cannot be tolerated. The motors selected have high power density and they are configured to operate under intense conditions”. The America’s Cup AC75 Class Rule allows the use of electric motors to operate hydraulic valves, drive clutches, rudders and foils. Teams may also use motors for driving simulator platforms and numerous test jigs.

Te Aihe is currently en-route to Cagliari, Sardinia, for the first America’s Cup World Series (ACWS) event in April where all the AC75s will race against each other for the first time. In the absence of Te Aihe the team finally revealed their test boat which was about a year behind the other teams. This was a strategic and considered decision. The reveal of Te Kāhu at this late stage in the campaign allowed development alongside the first AC75 to wholesomely contribute in the construction of the next AC75. Te Kāhu allows the sailors to continue training in a model that as close as possible mirrors the first AC75. You’ve heard slow and steady wins the race. Now watch this space.

ACWS | Cagliari, Sardinia | April 2020.

maxon Group tel. +61 2 9457 7477.

maxon Group is an Official Supplier to Emirates Team New Zealand.

 

New! Tiny motor controller from maxon.

maxon are pleased to introduce a new miniature positioning controller, the EPOS4 Micro 24/5 CAN for single and multi-axis applications. At 32mm x 22mm don’t judge the size of the controller, with performance near identical to the larger positioning controllers within its family.

Addressing cost-sensitive applications, maxon have created a miniature motor controller that packs some serious punch – the EPOS4 Micro 24/5 CAN. The functionality, operation, software, and accessories of the new controller duplicate the existing range of EPOS4 products. Suitable for use with both brushed DC and brushless EC motors (BLDC) of up to 120 W the motor controller has comprehensive feedback options such as Hall sensors, as well as digital incremental and SSI absolute encoders. State-of-the art concepts such as Dual Loop, Field Oriented Control (FOC), feed forward, and observer control allow optimal control in a wide variety of applications.

The existing digital and analog inputs and outputs are configurable and ideally matched to the numerous functions and operating modes of the CiA-402 positioning controller. The intuitive EPOS Studio start-up software, as well as libraries and programming examples for integration in a wide variety of master systems, are available free of charge and make operation as easy as possible. A plug-and-play EvaluationBoard (EB) is provided for initial commissioning. The offer is rounded out by a comprehensive scope of accessories and detailed product documentation.

The first derivative of this new micro design is the CANopen version, which can also be addressed via RS232 or USB, as usual. In Autumn 2020, the EPOS4 Micro 24/5 EtherCAT will follow as a second product of similarly small size.

Visit epos.maxongroup.com for the latest updates about EPOS and individual devices, EPOS Studio, as well as all downloads and technical documentation.

maxon motor Australia tel. +61 2 9457 7477.

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Hub drives – the next step for modular robots

maxon motor UK office spoke with Philip Norman at Ross Robotics, who has created greater flexibility with his modular robots via innovative use of hub drives.

Ross Robotics specialises in remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) that are modular. The robots are designed to be made from generic parts to build robots small, medium and large. Tools and sensors are modular too and can be plugged on to suit the application. One robot can then perform different functions, which is highly unusual in the robotic world.

An unusual advantage

The latest modules offer greater flexibility than previously by using hub drives. Hub drives consist of motors and electronics inside a wheel case. These are stand-alone units, one of the advantages being that little maintenance is required. The speed and torque of the ROV can be changed quickly by swapping to a different hub drive. ‘The idea is to hide the complexity from the end-user to provide a range of performance options’ said Philip Norman, Research and Development Director of Ross, ‘If you want a police force robot to travel at 25 kmh or a bomb disposal unit to travel at 1 kmh, the hub drive will look the same from the outside but will be calibrated to perform to a specific task.’

Philip’s team are now using the maxon EC flat motor series with accompanying maxon gearboxes in each hub. Philip explained that initially they were using an alternative gearbox combined with a maxon motor. ‘We thought we needed a customised gearbox. This was expensive and we found they were prone to failure. We then tried an off-the-shelf maxon motor and maxon gearbox and it worked perfectly.’

The modular ROV’s have huge potential from mine inspection in South America to perimeter fence patrolling in Scandinavia. In agriculture, they can be used inside chicken farms. The robots are used to check the welfare of the birds. By using autonomous or remote-controlled navigation, onboard modular sensors can monitor the air quality, as well as the chicken distribution. Chicken aggression can be a big problem. Because robots are not imprinted as predators (unlike the human stockman) they can modify the behaviour of the birds by interacting with them, like ‘super hens’, allowing smaller birds to get to the feeders and drinkers. This is hugely beneficial for the birds’ welfare and results in improved commercial outcomes for the farmer.

The nuclear industry is using robots to explore areas hostile to humans. The robots can endure rough terrain and deploy modular sensors, LIDARs, cameras and Geiger counters to determine the quality of the environment. When equipped with suitable tool modules they also perform useful decommissioning tasks.

Ross Robotics offers a range of hub motors, depending upon customer requirements. They promise quality and reliability. ‘Our biggest worry is failure. No-one wants a call at 2 am from a customer in Australia to say that your robot has failed, and it’s affecting business’, says Philip. ‘This is why we use maxon products. maxon has a great reputation globally, we only have to say that the Hub has maxon motors and gearboxes in it and customers are reassured. If we want to deliver a quality product, the quality of our suppliers is paramount.’

Please contact Karen Whittaker, Marketing Manager maxon UK and Ireland, for more information.

maxon motor Australia tel. +61 2 9457 7477.

Left to right: maxon EC flat motor with gearbox; hub drive from Ross Robotics; and hub drive.

Motorising an Automated Guided Vehicle.

Automated Guided Vehicles (AGVs) are most often used in industrial applications to transport heavy materials around warehouses or factories. It is critical AGVs don’t fail. The choice of motorisation is key.

If you’re thinking about motorising an AGV we have five fundamental points to bear in mind and introduce maxon’s IDX drive.

  1. Choose compact motorisation

Compactness is an important factor in warehouses both in the machinery used and the storage solutions themselves. Customer demands have increased and 24-hour delivery is becoming the norm. As things stand, warehouses can no longer afford to be far from major delivery areas. The price per m2 on the outskirts of a town is not the same as it is in the middle of the countryside, so logistics firms are opting for high-rack storage solutions. This means they need ergonomic robots that can move vertically and reach required heights. However, it is difficult, if not impossible, to have a compact AGV if the motor is bulky, therefore it is essential to choose compact motorisation. Drives must also be able to fit into restricted spaces, as they are sometimes integrated into existing trucks. A small footprint is a major issue for applications in logistics.

  1. Focus on true plug-and-play solutions

Essentially, robots were designed to help humans, and motorising an AGV is no exception. maxon’s IDX compact drives have all possible connectivity options as standard and are adjustable to suit individual needs. When you plug the IDX drive in, it works immediately, because they are delivered pre-programmed – a true plug-and-play solution.

When you place an order for an IDX motor, you define all the parameters you need through our online configurator. How the product communicates, what cables are needed, the electronics you choose, the motor power, whether or not you want a brake, etc. You can program everything online in just a few clicks. That way, the motor is configured to suit you and is delivered ready to use.

Motors with integrated electronics can be managed remotely because they are connected. The communication buses used can communicate both with the EtherCAT and CANopen systems, and in the future with IoT networks, too. Robots can therefore be programmed by computer and controlled remotely, which makes maintenance much simpler. This means you can work at one time on your entire fleet of AGVs, to run diagnostics or carry out an update, for example.

  1. Prioritise safety

AGVs operate in close proximity to operators, staff and other AGVs. It is therefore necessary to maintain safe human/ machine interaction, encompassing all of the safety measures. Robots have movement and optical sensors allowing them to detect the presence of humans and avoid any risk of collision. This safety-oriented approach applies also to motorisation. To avoid any danger from overheating, for instance, IDX drives have two integrated temperature sensors, one inside the motor and the other within the electronics. If there is a problem, the motor is secured immediately, without waiting until the whole envelope has overheated. Most motors on the market lack this responsiveness because they have sensors only for the electronics. The motorisation of AGVs can be a technical challenge. To meet customer needs, maxon has designed an exceptionally compact motor, with performance 25% better than its competitors, while keeping pricing competitive.

  1. Base the design on modularity

Not all AGVs do the same job. Some will carry loads of 1 tonne or more, while others will lift loads of around 100kg; some will travel in a straight line, while others will have an integrated steering function.

Motorisation requirements vary with each application, and that is why it’s essential to have a modular solution as a base. It’s imperative to choose the type of motor, power rating, electronics, connectivity, type of communication, the protection rating of the motor, and whether or not a brake or an encoder is required.

All these parameters can be easily configured online. Maxon’s innovative configuration tool is unique in the market; customers benefit from highly organised production that can develop a drive solution to match requirements in just 19 days.

  1. Opt for fast delivery

Today, responsiveness is fundamental and expected as standard. maxon is well aware of the challenges in the AGV sector and guarantees delivery of IDX solutions in 19 days.

Irrespective of how you use your AGV, with maxon’s capabilities and tooling, you can be sure you will have the right motorisation. Find out more about maxon’s IDX compact drive.

maxon motor Australia tel. +61 2 9457 7477.

A strong impression.

Hardness testers are used to check whether materials have the desired characteristics. These days, this is done in a fully automated, networked process.

A material’s hardness can be used to gain information on various other properties, and the history of using hardness measurement to identify, analyse, or improve materials goes back over a hundred years. The principle has remained more or less the same – at least when it comes to metals. With a defined amount of force, a diamond or other testing object is pressed against the material to be measured. Measuring the penetration depth or the size of the impression then allows conclusions to be drawn about the hardness, which in turn can be used to derive other valuable insights about the material.

Since quality control plays an increasingly important role in industry, hardness testing today is a standard step in many labs, production facilities, and incoming and outgoing goods stations. The machines used for the task need to be smart, precise, and fast. In the age of Industry 4.0, networking capability and secure digital data archiving are also key.

The Austrian company Qness has tackled these challenges. Since 2010, Qness has been developing and producing hardness testing devices for a wide variety of applications in the automotive and aerospace industries, in medical technology, and in research. In the words of Robert Höll, General & Technical Manager, the relatively young company with 40 employees has “struck a nerve” with its products.

The latest generation of the company’s micro testing devices are used mainly in the laboratory and are able to perform hardness testing automatically. They are operated via a PC-based software, have an automatic tool changer, and support the usual testing methods (Vickers, Knoop, and Brinell). “We are also the first in the industry to integrate 3D representations into the user interface and enable the import of 3D data into the software,” says Robert Höll. This achieves a very high level of user friendliness.

The devices are able to perform a long series of tests automatically. Test sequences can be stored in the form of programs and reused as templates. The measuring results are evaluated to generate and document statistics and hardness curves. The results can be digitally archived and are available anytime and anywhere. This is an important factor in the digital age of networking.

However, all this is useful only if the measurements are accurate. High accuracy is therefore another important goal of Qness. “Our accuracy is now significantly better than that required by the standard,” says Robert Höll. To achieve this, the company uses only high-quality products – such as DC motors from maxon. Up to six of them are used per device, for positioning workpieces and tool turrets, as well as for tool-changing systems.

Qness relied on maxon from the start. The company particularly appreciates the online configurator, which allows customers to build specific drive systems. The requirements are clear: long service life, low noise, and short lead times. “The drives need to be very precise. After all, they need to move the slide with micrometer accuracy. We can’t afford compromises.”

As a next step, Qness wants to further expand its international sales and continue working on new innovations in the field of analytic devices. Robert Höll says: “As a developer, there is nothing more exciting than designing a machine concept, getting the first prototype to run, and to test whether it fulfills the expectations.”

For further information please contact maxon motor Australia tel. +61 2 9457 7477.

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