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Excitement heightens as America’s Cup teams and fans anticipate first ever AC75 launch.

It is always a big deal in any America’s Cup cycle when the first tranche of AC Class yachts is revealed.

Fans and teams alike pore over every photograph and video they can get their hands on to analyse what each of the teams’ design departments have come up with.

That eager anticipation is ratcheted up several levels however when the teams are given the much rarer opportunity to design to a completely new America’s Cup class rule – as is the case for the 36th edition of the America’s Cup with the advent of the 75-foot foiling monohull AC75 Class Rule.

Even more exciting and challenging is the fact that designing and building a foiling monohull of that size has never ever been done before. It is an utterly new concept – and that means the designers are out on their own, breaking new ground with precious little, if any, relevant data available to refer back to.

It is now a tantalising prospect that four teams – the Defender Emirates Team New Zealand, Luna Rossa Prada Pirelli Team (Challenger of Record), NYYC American Magic, and INEOS TEAM UK – could all launch their first AC75 yachts in the next few weeks.

The fifth America’s Cup team – Stars + Stripes Team USA – is yet to complete the build of its AC75, but the team hopes to have the boat on the water later this year.

So what can we expect to learn from this upcoming first round of AC75 launches?

As is always the case with the America’s Cup, the teams have been tight-lipped about the direction they have taken with the first of the two AC75s they are allowed to build under the terms laid down in the Protocol for the 36th America’s Cup.

But the Head of Design at Emirates Team New Zealand, Dan Bernasconi – who helped mastermind the AC75 design rule in the first place – said he was confident the boats would be thrilling for the fans to watch as well as extremely demanding for the crews to learn how to sail at optimum performance.

“We wanted to develop a class of yacht which was going to be exciting but also really challenging to sail,” Bernasconi said. “We will find out when we launch and actually get out on the water, but we think the new boat is going to achieve those aims really well.”

According to Bernasconi, until the teams reveal their boats nobody has any idea what they will each look like – but he expects there to be some big differences.

“It’s pretty interesting because the design rule is quite open,” he said. “There is a lot of openness in the hull design – the shape of hull and the layout of the deck – and also in the mainsail configuration and the foil wings and the flaps mechanism.

“So there will likely be quite a big variation between our yacht and everyone else’s yachts. In fact I think they will all be quite different – so there is a huge amount of interest from all the designers in different areas to see what other teams have come up with.”

Martin Fischer – co-design coordinator at Luna Rossa Prada Pirelli Team – was also involved in coming up with the AC75 class rule. He says designing to a totally new America’s Cup class rule has added an extra level of excitement to the process for the designers at the Italian syndicate.

“The opportunity to design an America’s Cup boat to a brand-new rule is very rare – typically something that happens only every 10 or 15 years,” Fischer said.

“Everybody in the team here is really excited to get the chance to work on designing to this new class rule. I think every designer who has been given this opportunity will be really excited, like we are.”

Fischer says the task of producing from scratch one of the first ever 75-foot single-hull yachts has required he and his team to take several steps into the unknown along the way to launching their first iteration of the design.

“We are definitely getting into new territory with these new boats,” he said. “A foiling monohull of this size has never been designed and built before – so there are many, many unknowns.

“There is lots of pressure on the design team because there is no experience from previous boats. Obviously we have the experience from the AC50 catamarans – but there’s never been a boat like the AC75 before.”

“That means you have to turn over every stone and look at every aspect carefully, because around every corner there could be something unexpected. You definitely don’t want to get a nasty surprise once the boat is launched and that adds to the level of pressure on us as designers.”

NYYC American Magic skipper Terry Hutchinson said he and his team were revelling in the challenge of bringing the large-scale foiling monohull concept to life, along with the pressure of delivering a competitive design.

“It’s always great to be on the leading side of design and development and it’s always something that our group have prided ourselves in,” Hutchinson said. “We are in a competition, and we want to win. With that goal comes pressure to deliver.

What differences there might be between the teams’ first AC75 designs, Hutchinson said he was waiting to find out like everyone else.

“We will have to see once the boats hit the water,” he said. “All of the design teams are of the highest standard, so it is an exciting time for everyone.”

Sir Ben Ainslie, team Principal and skipper at the British INEOS TEAM UK syndicate, said he expected there to be huge interest when the first AC75s are launched.

 

“This is an entirely new concept of boat so there has been a lot of anticipation about how it will sail and how it will perform at this scale,” Ainslie said. “We have seen the test boats out there over the last 12 months or so, but to get the real deal – 75-foot foiling monohulls out there means there will be a lot of interest.”

Ainslie described the planned launch and first sail of the British AC75 as a milestone moment for the team – especially given that the first opportunity for the teams to race against each other will be in April 2020 at the America’s Cup World Series regatta in Cagliari, Sardinia.

“Certainly as a team there has been a huge amount of work and effort that has gone into designing and building this boat,” He said. “It will be a real thrill to get it out sailing for the first time and to get it up on the foils and see how it manoeuvres.”

The five-time Olympic medal-winning yachtsman said he expected the new boats to be stunning to watch and a real handful for the crews – despite being made up of some of the best sailors in the world – to master.

“I think this boat will turn heads for sure,” he said. “I’m expecting it to be the most exciting boat that I have ever sailed – a 75-foot foiling monohull. The predicted speeds of these boats are really quite phenomenal, and it is going to be a huge challenge and a huge adrenaline rush to sail them well.”

The team that will have to wait a bit longer to feel the rush of flying the AC75 is the second American challenger- Stars + Stripes Team USA, led by Mike Buckley.

“Our plan is to launch our AC75 later this year, but the exact date is still to be determined,” Buckley said. “The other teams’ anticipated launch dates are a little bit prior to that, and we will definitely have boots on the ground, and we’ll be trying to learn as much as we can while our boat is under construction.

“The most exciting day for me is the day when we put this AC75 in the water and make sure she floats. Then we will take a deep breath and say: ‘well we have a boat that floats – now let’s make sure we have a boat that flies”.

“There will be a lot of hard work on the back end of that, Buckley said. “Every day we will be trying to get a little bit better and keeping the fire burning in the team. We will be hungry and we will be pushing, like everybody else.

Although the precise timing of when individual teams might splash their AC75s for the first time is a closely guarded secret, it is likely that they will conduct one or more unannounced ‘private’ test sails, potentially followed by a more public official launch or naming ceremony.

For now that’s going to keep sailing fans around the world guessing as they eagerly await the first glimpses of what the AC75s will look like.

The good news though, is that under the rules of this cycle of the America’s Cup the teams are not allowed to shroud their boats with skirts or covers, meaning there should be plenty for us all – the fans and the teams – to discuss when the photos and videos are finally made public.

maxon Australia tel. +61 2 9457 7477.

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Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron announces key dates for 150th celebrations

maxon Australia is an Official Supplier to Emirates Team New Zealand. We follow their progress on their journey as Defenders in the 36th America’s Cup campaign in March 2021.

A plethora of events will be held throughout 2021 to mark the Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron’s 150 years, which also coincides with Auckland hosting the 36th America’s Cup.

Throughout the clubs amazing 150 year history it has led the world of yachting in many respects, being the only club to win, lose and then win back the world’s oldest sporting trophy – The America’s Cup.  It has trained many world champions in various disciplines of the sport.  The largest sporting club in New Zealand also runs a variety of volunteer programs that will be essential to the delivery of what will be a bumper 2021.

Visitors and locals alike can be assured of an exciting and diverse calendar including J Class racing, superyacht regattas, as well as offshore and New Zealand based races.

RNZYS Vice Commodore Aaron Young is thrilled with the events secured in the calendar so far, and with the other events that are close to being added to the 150th year calendar.

“We have already added some really great events, and pencilled in some others, throughout the America’s Cup period and for the duration of the year that we believe our membership base and the entire country can really get behind.”

Kicking the sesquicentenary celebrations off with a race to Kawau Island on New Year’s Eve 2020 which will be followed by the Kawau New Year’s Day Regatta, and then by a Kawau to Great Barrier Cruise from the 3rd – 6th of January.

The Squadron has also secured two offshore races for their 150th year. The first is a race from Sydney to Auckland in conjunction with the Royal Prince Alfred Yacht Club, starting on the 1st of February. The second is a race from Auckland to Southport Yacht Club in Queensland, starting on the 1st of June.

In what is one of the most anticipated additions to the calendar, the Squadron is hopeful of a number of J Class Yachts coming to New Zealand with planned sailing in the Bay of Islands in February, and in Auckland 1st to 6th of March.  There is strong interest from the class already with entries now open for them to commit to these events.

The J Class yachts will be a spectacular sight and will add a great deal of excitement for the general public and especially for avid sailing fans during the America’s Cup period.  The J Class yachts are 40-45 metres long and have a crew of 30 plus professional sailors on board. They were used in the America’s cup during the 1930’s period.

There will be an abundance of Superyachts joining in the celebrations, with a Superyacht regatta locked in for the 25th – 27th February that the RNZYS is organising in Auckland, which will likely be the biggest that has ever been seen on New Zealand waters.

These visitors will inject millions into the local economy, creating jobs along the way.  The Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron will ensure they have plenty to do whilst in New Zealand to support this.  For visiting superyachts the Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron also offers full logistical support to ensure their time in New Zealand is as stress free as possible. They simply contact superyachtsupport@rnzys.org.nz to have anything required arranged.

Dates are to be confirmed for the America’s Cup Christmas Regatta and the PRADA Cup Challenger Selection Series in January /February 2021.

The biggest event of the year is the 36th America’s Cup match which will see its opening weekend in Auckland on March 6th and 7th 2021.

Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED) General Manager, Destination Steve Armitage says 2021 is going to be an unprecedented year for the region.

“Auckland is gearing up to host a mega year of events starting with the 36th America’s Cup, the Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadrons 150th and finishing with APEC Leaders’ Week. There will also be a diverse array of international sporting events such as the Women’s Rugby and Cricket World Cups, World Softball Championships, the national kapa haka festival, Te Matatini, along with the exciting annual events calendar,” he says.

“We’re looking forward to welcoming the world here and showing off Auckland’s stunning natural attributes, culture and city sophistication.”

There are also two more globally recognized events that are in the pipeline, as RNZYS Vice Commodore Aaron Young explains – “We have formally invited the 52 Super Series fleet to join us from Europe for an official 52 Super Series regatta, as well as the 12m fleet to join us from Europe and USA to celebrate our big year with us. Whilst shipping is a considerable cost for both of these fleets to get to NZ, we are hopeful that Kiwis will get to see them both racing here in 2021.”

Writer and sailing historian Ivor Wilkins is currently putting together a beautiful coffee table style book that will chronicle the entire 150 year history of the RNZYS, as well as including the 150th year celebrations, which will be released on the 2nd of October 2021. The Squadron is also in the works to have a special commemorative coin, and other precious memorabilia that will be available for all to purchase and cherish.

“The team at the RNZYS are very busy working behind the scenes to get all of the planned events fixed in the calendar.  Entries are now open for the major events, so stay tuned for more dates and details to be announced in the coming weeks.” – RNZYS Vice Commodore Aaron Young.

For further information please contact maxon Australia tel. +61 2 9457 7477.

Source: Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron, 19 June 2019

Update: Emirates Team New Zealand

maxon Australia is an Official Supplier to Emirates Team New Zealand. We follow their progress on their journey as Defenders in the 36th America’s Cup campaign in March 2021.

America’s Cup cheat sheet – two years on.

Emirates Team New Zealand June 28, 2019.

SOURCE: Newsroom – Suzanne McFadden

It’s exactly two years since Emirates Team New Zealand won the America’s Cup in Bermuda, and a lot of water has flowed under Te Wero Bridge, in Auckland’s Viaduct, since then.

A radical foiling monohull has been conceived, and is now coming to life in boatyards around the world. Battles over bases have been lost, and won. Teams have come, teams have gone.

But if you’ve lost touch with the goings-on of the 36th America’s Cup, we’ve called on the assistance of Team NZ veteran Kevin Shoebridge, to help remedy that; so you can now sound up to speed with your yachting mates at the water cooler. SportsRoom presents The 2021 America’s Cup cheat sheet: two years gone, less than two to go.

THE DEFENDER

Team NZ are running like a “well-oiled machine”, says Shoebridge, the team’s COO. But that’s what you’d expect from an outfit whose genesis goes back beyond 1995, and who hit the ground running from the moment they came home with the Auld Mug.

Their team now numbers 120 (with a few bodies more to come), and are fully ensconced in their two HQs – their spectacular main base in the Viaduct Events Centre, and the boat building yard in Albany.

Of those, 42 people are in the boatyard, building the first of their two AC75 extreme racing machines (it’s the first time in Team NZ’s history that they’ve built their own boats).

The building process is well on track for the initial boat to be launched in late August, although Shoebridge admits it’s taken slightly longer than Team NZ envisaged.

They now have their mast, made at Southern Spars in Auckland’s west, and are awaiting the delivery from Italy of the massive foil arms (that look like the legs of a Jesus Christ lizard running across water) which support the boat when it’s flying.

The team are at 95 per cent capacity, with the last of the sailing crew to still be named. So far, there’s a core crew of eight (11 sailors will be on board the AC75), with the rest of the grinders – to be named this week – bringing it up to around 14. Yes, grinders are back in; cyclors are out (watch the grinding trials in the video above).

“The core sailing team – the likes of Glenn Ashby, Peter Burling, Blair Tuke and Ray Davies – have been intricately involved in the design process of the boat; you can’t design a boat without your sailors,” Shoebridge says.

While they wait for the boat to touch down on the Waitemata Harbour, the sailors are racing around the world. Burling and Tuke are off this week to a 49er regatta in Germany, preparing to defend their Olympic title in Tokyo next year; Ashby is racing the G32 foiling multihulls world champs in Portugal; Andy Maloney and Josh Junior have just finished a successful European season in their Olympic Finn dinghies.

Unlike the three established challenger teams, Team NZ decided not to build a test boat – a scaled-down foiling monohull – opting to “sail” their boat on a simulator, as they did with major success before Bermuda.

“The simulator side of things has given us some really good insights into what the boat’s performances will be. Some of the numbers we are seeing at the moment are quite in excess of the 50-foot catamarans we used last time, both upwind and downwind,” Ashby told Stuff.

So the sailing team are itching to finally get back on the Hauraki Gulf.

“It feels like it’s time to get out there again. Time to split off from the infrastructure and the event, and finally focus on the sailing,” Shoebridge says.

They won’t have long to wait now.

THE CHALLENGERS

As it stands, five teams are still in the running to race in the Prada Cup, the America’s Cup challenger series, in January 2021. But in a week’s time, the number of challengers could be slashed to three.

There’s no danger of losing the trio of challenging heavyweights – Italy’s Luna Rossa, Sir Ben Ainslie’s Ineos Team UK, and American Magic from the hallowed New York Yacht Club.

But two of the three late challengers that were accepted, Stars + Stripes USA and DutchSail, have until July 1 to confirm their commitment to the Cup. It’s no secret both teams have struggled to find the financial backing needed to get a new campaign on the water.

“We’re trying to be as supportive as we can to get these two teams across the line, because we all want them to succeed,” Shoebridge says. “The issue is that, sooner or later, they’re going to run out of time to build a boat and be in Cagliari next April to race in the first World Series event.”

Teams must race in that first event if they’re to compete in the 2021 challenger trials in Auckland.

The Stars + Stripes team, out of Long Beach, California, have had a recent change in management, and launched a public appeal for funding. A campaign big on diversity and inclusion, their boat is about halfway through construction, thanks to buying the Team NZ design package.

The first-ever campaign from the Netherlands is still endeavouring to form partnerships with Dutch tech and marine companies, but say that behind the scenes, “everything is really progressing”. They don’t intend to launch their sole boat, Salamander, until next March – at least six months after everyone else.

“They [Stars + Stripes and DutchSail] are doing everything they can to be here, and that deserves our support,” Shoebridge says. “That’s why over the last six months we’ve tried to encourage them by helping design their boats, which we see as an absolute no-brainer. It gives them something to sell, and prove they can be competitive from day one.”

The third late entry, Malta Altus Challenge, withdrew last month. The campaign out of Malta, backed by an Italian real estate mogul, and made up mostly of the old Swedish Artemis team, couldn’t pull enough money together.

THE BOAT

While the four top teams plough on with building their new AC75 foiling monohulls, the three established challengers are out testing their scaled-down versions – which, interestingly, are all very different in shape and size.

American Magic are sailing “The Mule” – an 11.5m monohull modified with foils – off their winter sailing base on Pensacola Bay in Florida. The 38-footer is the longest surrogate boat allowed under the Cup Protocol (teams can only launch two AC75s, which are 22.8m long).

And although they’ve capsized it, they’ve also been crowing about sailing ‘dry laps’, without the hull touching the water.

Ineos Team UK’s test boat, “T5”, is smaller at 8.5 m – scaled at 40 percent of the AC75. The two-crew boat has been sailing off Portsmouth for a year now as part of their design development for the Cup boat.

Just last week, Luna Rossa put their test boat into the waters of Cagliari – the team’s base in Sardinia – for the first time, and in true America’s Cup fashion, they’re revealing little about it.

But rest assured, Team NZ has been watching all three boats very closely. Especially since they haven’t built one themselves.

“We decided not to go down that route,” Shoebridge says. “In the initial plan, there was a World Series event in October this year, and we wanted to put all our focus into building our first AC75.

“It would have been nice to have a smaller boat to iron out a few of the bugs, but we’re going straight to full scale.”

But there’s still a “very good likelihood” that Team NZ will build a smaller boat for testing ideas – because it’s quicker, cheaper and more efficient.  And they will need something to develop things on while their brand new AC75 heads to Europe in February and will be away racing for six months.

It won’t be long now till we see the AC75s edging out of their boatyards for the very first time.

Under the protocol, the boats could be launched any time from April 1. But a hold-up with the design of the boat’s foil arms – a one-design component provided to every team – has slowed up everyone’s boat building phase.

When the original carbon foil arm failed a stress test in Italy, all of the teams came together to design a stronger version.  “Now [we’ve] got a solution everyone is happy with. Of course, it’s slightly heavier and more conservative, but it’s reliable,” Shoebridge says.

He’s guessing the British boat will be the first in the water in early August. Only the Italians have announced their launch date – August 25. Team NZ will be around that time too – they’re fourth in line to receive their foil arms.

“It’s going to be fascinating when we see these boats launched. They might all be similar, but they could be completely different. As the second generation comes around, you’ll probably see the boats coming closer together in design,” Shoebridge says.

When we see the AC75s line up against each other for the first time next April, Shoebridge warns we shouldn’t get too concerned about what happens on the water. “There’s a long way to go from the first generation to where you could end up.”

When the boats compete in that Cagliari World Series, the second boats will already be half-built. All of the teams’ second boats are likely to be on the water in the New Zealand spring of 2020, with most teams probably settling here in September.

THE EVENT

The first of the America’s Cup World Series events, raced between the challengers and the defender, was originally scheduled for Cagliari this October, but has been postponed until April 2020.

Part of the reason was the hold-up of the one-design foil arms; another part was to allow the late challengers to have AC75s ready to compete. But the date shift also gives teams more time on the water working out how to master these new beasts.

“The fact is our first AC75 goes onto a ship next February and takes 52 days to get to Europe; then we won’t see it back in Auckland for another six months,” Shoebridge says.

There will be three, possibly four, World Series events next year – with regattas likely in the UK, the US, and maybe one in New Zealand.

That’s all before the Christmas Cup, in December 2020, contested on the Hauraki Gulf racecourses pegged out for the 2021 America’s Cup. That will be the last time the challengers and defender compete together.

The company running the entire event in Auckland, America’s Cup Event Ltd (ACE), is operating from the second floor of the Viaduct Events Centre, with former Team NZ director Tina Symmans as chair.

THE VILLAGE

From the yellow meeting room inside Team NZ’s sprawling base on Halsey Wharf, Shoebridge looks west to the Harbour Bridge.

“You look out this window and see work on the bases for the Brits and American Magic on Wynyard Point,” he says.

The flattened base pads, where silos once stood, should be handed over in early August to those two challengers, who will construct their own buildings.

“Then you look out those windows,” he says, pointing to the east, “and there’s construction on Hobson Wharf, and the breakwaters and marinas”.

The Wynyard Edge Alliance (WEA), the organisation formed by the government and Auckland Council to deliver the infrastructure, is in full flight.

The dull banging of a pile driver is continuous, as 84 piles are installed for the Hobson Wharf extension, where Luna Rossa’s base will stand. A completed breakwater alongside the wharf will help still the waters around the Viaduct Harbour, and more are under construction. The entrance to the channel has been dredged – so far over 60,000 cubic metres of “material” has been dug out and disposed of outside the harbour.

“This America’s Cup village is going to be a very cool environment, that we’re super-proud of,” Shoebridge says.

Team NZ are in the Viaduct Events Centre for the “foreseeable future” – maybe until they lose their grip on the silverware. Although this wasn’t Team NZ’s original choice of base – finally fixed after six months of tense negotiations between the team, Government and council – Shoebridge concedes “it’s the best base we’ve ever had”.

There will be more public engagement with the team than ever before. People will be able to easily see New Zealand’s boats being craned in and out of the shed each day, and large screens on the side of the base will broadcast live racing. The Team NZ merchandise shop is already open and humming on the ground floor.

The team are all together on the top floor, keeping the open plan environment that worked so well for them in their old cramped space on Beaumont St in the last campaign. Just with more leg room.

There’s already a hive of activity at the northern end of the building, transformed into a working boat yard, although the boats have yet to arrive.

“The docks are in, the dredging is done,” Shoebridge says. “As soon as we have the boat here, we’re ready to sail.”

For further information on DC motors for use in underwater and extreme environments please contact maxon motor Australia tel. +61 2 9457 7477.

PMDC brushed right-angle motors from Parvalux.

Permanent magnet brushed DC right-angle geared motors that can incorporate other application components into the complete drive system.

A part of Parvalux’s brushed geared motor range is the PM10 MWS, 180Vdc, 2rpm, 8.5Nm motor. With high starting torque these right angle geared motors are suitable for a vast range of applications in particular those exposed to high temperatures. Offering similar specs to the Baldour PMDC motor GP233020, Parvalux offer several levels of customisation from standard stock such as shaft variations, output flange options, various cable lengths, brakes, encoders, paint finishes and terminal boxes, through to fully customised solutions including the ability to incorporate other components from your application.

For further information please contact maxon Australia tel. +61 2 9457 7477.

We are maxon

From July 1, 2019 maxon dropped the word “motor” from its name.

maxon is evolving from a manufacturer of motors and components into a specialist for precision drive sys-tems. Known simply as maxon from 1 July, the company is changing its corporate structure to position it-self as a powerful group with a worldwide presence and the capability to respond to specific local de-mands. With a focus on five core markets – medical technology, aerospace, industrial automation, trans-portation & e-mobility and robotics. maxon drives are used wherever the requirements are particularly high, for example, in NASA’s Mars rovers, surgical power tools, humanoid robots and in precision industrial applications. maxon’s expertise beyond drive technology consists of mechatronics, battery management systems and software & cloud services. At maxon Australia, a fully integrated service is on offer with the introduction of Dr Carlos Bacigalupo who is an expert in controller integration, system analysis and configuration assistance.

For further information please contact maxon Australia tel. +61 2 9457 7477.

Key race management, class rule and measurement personnel announced for the 36th America’s Cup presented by Prada.

maxon Australia is an Official Supplier to Emirates Team New Zealand. We follow their progress on their journey as Defenders in the 36th America’s Cup campaign in March 2021.

Key race management, class rule and measurement personnel announced for the 36th America’s Cup presented by Prada.

The Defender and Challenger of Record organisations for the America’s Cup presented by Prada have announced the specialist race management, rules and measurement teams chosen for the competition’s 36th edition taking place in Auckland, New Zealand in 2021.

Race Management

America’s Cup stalwart John Craig (CAN) has been named as Regatta Director and will be in ultimate charge of all racing activity, including in 2020 the America’s Cup World Series events and the Prada Cup Challenger Selection Series, and the America’s Cup Match in 2021.

Highly experienced rules expert Richard Slater (AUS) has been chosen as Chief Umpire and as such oversees a hand-picked team of umpires responsible for ensuring fair racing at all America’s Cup events.

AC75 Class Rule Committee

A dedicated committee of rules experts has been introduced for this latest edition of the America’s Cup to provide the competing teams with official interpretations on the AC75 Class Rule as they each design and build their revolutionary foiling monohull yachts.

The AC75 Class Rule Committee is made up of internationally-renowned sailing experts Stan Honey (USA), Carlos de Beltràn (ESP) and Hasso Hoffmeister (GER) and has already been active for the last year responding to the teams’ requests for specific clarification of the Class Rule.

Measurement Committee

The Measurement Committee is responsible for conducting all measurement-related checks of the teams’ AC75 foiling monohull yachts – which are expected to be launched over the coming months – and for issuing AC75 Class certificates.

Shaun Ritson (AUS) is the coordinator of the Measurement Committee, with the supporting expertise of Daniel Jowett (NZL) and David McCollough (USA).

Commenting on the appointments, Russell Green, rules and legal advisor for the Defender Emirates Team New Zealand, was instrumental in bringing the race officials together for the 36th America’s Cup.

“We are fortunate to have secured the services of such well respected international officials with established reputations at the top level of our sport including previous experience in the America’s Cup,” Green commented.

Matteo Plazzi – Technical Director at the Challenger of Record America’s Cup 36 – the organisation responsible for running the Prada Cup Challenger Selection Series and the America’s Cup World Series – said each of the appointees: “brought a wealth of experience and integrity to the 36th edition of the America’s Cup”.

“Their appointments reinforce our commitment as Challenger of Record to fair competition and exceptional racing for the Challenging teams in the events we are organising in 2020 and 2021, as well as in the America’s Cup Match,” Plazzi said.

For further information please contact maxon Australia tel. +61 2 9457 7477.

 

Notes to the Editor

RACE MANAGEMENT

John Craig (CAN) – Regatta Director

A hugely experienced and well-respected race management expert, Craig was principal race officer at the 34th America’s Cup and the associated challenger selection series and America’s Cup World Series regattas. He also oversaw the inception of World Sailing’s Sailing World Cup international regatta series and was race manager for US Sailing’s prestigious Miami Olympic Classes Regatta, as well as serving as race director for the Extreme Sailing Series and the Red Bull Foiling Generation series.

Richard Slater (AUS) – Chief Umpire

Slater is a World Sailing qualified international umpire and judge and was the chief umpire at the 35th America’s Cup in Bermuda. He also is the vice chairman of the World Sailing racing rules committee, a member of the international umpires sub-committee and chairs or is a member of numerous World Sailing working parties. He also headed up the World Sailing working party which created the high-speed rules that are used by many classes of high-performance boats. As well as his race management experience, Slater has worked with several professional sailing teams as a rules advisor and in team management – including teams that have won the America’s Cup three times and the Volvo Ocean Race once. Slater also provides support to the Australian Sailing Team ahead of the Tokyo 2021 Olympic Games.

AC75 CLASS RULE COMMITTEE

Stan Honey (USA)

One of the world’s best-known racing navigators, Honey’s achievements include winning the Volvo Ocean Race around the world and setting a Jules Verne record for the fastest non-stop circumnavigation of the planet – as well as contributing as a navigator for multiple other 24-hour-distance, transatlantic, transpacific and singlehanded records.  Honey holds a bachelor’s degree in engineering and applied science from Yale University and a master’s degree in electrical engineering from Stanford. He is a three-time Emmy Winner for technical innovation in Sports TV, and a member of both the US National Inventors and the Sports Broadcasting Halls of Fame.  A prolific inventor, he holds 30 patents associated with navigation, tracking, and augmented reality graphics and led the development of the yellow ‘first-down line’ widely used now in the broadcast of American football. He is also responsible for the ESPN “K-Zone” baseball pitch tracking and highlighting system, as well as the Race/FX tracking and highlighting system used in NASCAR.

Carlos de Beltrán (ESP)

De Beltrán joined World Sailing as technical and offshore director in 2017 and has been involved with the last four editions of the America’s Cup.  He has also served as chief measurer for the M32 and RC44 class associations and was the equipment inspector for three editions of the Volvo Ocean Race. He holds two master’s degrees – one in naval architecture and one in product design.

Hasso Hoffmeister (GER)

Hoffmeister has worked for Classification Society DNVGL (formerly Germanischer Lloyd) since graduating as a naval architect in 1993. He is an expert in the assessment of marine structures, yachts and rigs and has developed several standards and guidelines, amongst which are the GL Guidelines for Structural Design of Racing Yachts. His particular field of expertise is the evaluation of composite structures. While working with Germanischer Lloyd, Hoffmeister was also rig designer of United Internet Team Germany’s during the 32nd America’s Cup.

MEASUREMENT COMMITTEE

Shaun Ritson (AUS) – Coordinator

Ritson has been a consultant naval architect for the past 25 years. He is a World Sailing international measurer for the Moth Class and served on the Measurement Committee for the 31st, 32nd and 34th America’s Cup editions. He was also a measurer for three Volvo Ocean Races, including serving as chief measurer for the 2011-12 edition.

Daniel Jowett (NZL)

An experienced navigator with many offshore racing miles to his name Jowett trained as a mechanical engineer specialising in yacht aerodynamics and has worked as an engineer at the Yacht Research unit and Twisted Flow wind tunnel in Auckland, as well as with Vspars. He has been involved in two editions of the Volvo Ocean Race, working in race control during the 2013-14 edition and as the electronics team leader in 2017-18.

David McCollough (USA)

McCollough operates McCollough Yachts LLC, a yacht design and engineering firm in Newport, Rhode Island. He studied mechanical engineering at Trinity University in San Antonio, Texas and yacht design at The Landing School in Kennebunkport, Maine.  McCollough Yachts has been responsible for several race-winning multihull sailboats as well as luxury cruising boats and has recently leveraged foiling knowledge gained from racing sailboats into innovative foil-assisted power catamarans.  As a member of the team which wrote the class rule for the 34th America’s Cup, McCollough has an excellent understanding of the unique intricacies of this competition.

A new docking system for space rendezvous

The European Space Agency (ESA) is working on a new system to enable easy docking between two spacecraft. maxon developed two special drive systems for this purpose.

Even though it’s been done many times before, the docking manoeuvre between two objects in space is always a delicate and potentially dangerous procedure. The speed is extremely high (about 28,000 km/h in case of the ISS), and corrections are difficult. For example, when the two objects are about to meet, manoeuvring thrusters can no longer be used, since their exhaust plumes can cause damage. To prevent harm, cargo transporters are caught by a robotic arm installed in the International Space Station (ISS) and berthed manually. Manned spacecraft on the other hand dock directly in a computer-controlled process.

This type of docking manoeuvre is going to become easier and safer in the future, so the European Space Agency (ESA) has commissioned its industry partners to design a new docking system called IBDM (International Berthing and Docking Mechanism). This conforms to the International Docking System Standard (IDSS), a standard on which the leading space agencies worldwide have agreed. The system will therefore be compatible with the ISS and most other spacecraft. The mechanism’s first missions will be with the Dream Chaser, a craft that looks like a compact version of the Space Shuttle and will soon perform cargo flights to the ISS. The craft is being developed by the Sierra Nevada Corporation.

Docking energy is absorbed

The IBDM is an androgynous coupling system. This means that the connector is identical on both sides. It consist of a hard inner ring (Hard Capture System) and a soft outer ring (Soft Capture System) that has six degrees of freedom and force sensors. The outer ring first absorbs the docking energy. Then the final airtight connection is made and secured by mechanical hooks which pull the two spacecraft tightly together.

SENER is in charge of developing and installing the Hard Capture System. The company is currently working on the qualification model, which is due for testing in 2020. “Then the IBDM needs to be used as quickly as possible on a supply flight for the ISS,” says SENER’s Gabriel Ybarra. One of the next steps would be to use it in NASA’s Lunar Space Station, which is planned to go into orbit around the moon and could serve as a launch point for manned missions to Mars in the future.

Dual systems for maximum safety

This is a challenging project for the engineers at SENER: “We first needed to fully understand all the requirements set by ESA and NASA and figure out how to fulfill these requirements. And especially with regard to safety, because the docking mechanism can also cope with manned flights.” As well as being lightweight and delivering the required torque, the electrical drives that are used must also be extremely reliable. This is why SENER has been working with the drive specialist maxon for several years.

maxon’s engineers have developed two drives for SENER that can be used to execute a huge variety of functions. This first drive consists of two brushless EC-4pole motors and a GPX UP gearhead. Twelve of these actuators power the locking hooks in the IBDM docking mechanism. The second drive combines a flat motor with a planetary gearhead. It is used in eleven places, to manage the plug-in connections and the retaining eyes, as well as other ancillary functions.

As the IBDM docking mechanism is a flight-critical application, redundant drive systems are required. The backup must function even if the primary drive fails. This is often solved by means of a backup motor that can take over in an emergency. This is the approach used for the locking hook actuator. For the other drive system however, the maxon engineers found a different, unconventional solution: an additional stator is used instead of an extra motor. The flat motor therefore has two stators and hence two windings, each of which is capable of independently driving the rotor – an ingenuous solution, which guarantees safety while saving space.

Gabriel Ybarra praises the collaboration with maxon: “The team understands our requirements and is very quick with design modifications.” Moreover, both partners have a passion for mechatronic systems. “It feels great to be involved in the entire cycle, from design to production and testing. This makes it extremely interesting. And when the system moves for the first time, it’s like watching your children take their first steps.”

For more information contact maxon motor Australia tel. +61 2 9457 7477.

maxon supplies automatic filter changer for super telescope

maxon has been selected to supply the optical filter changer system for what will soon be the largest wide field telescope in the world. The project, involving five French research laboratories, requires motors and controllers capable of working to an accuracy of 1/10th of a millimetre.

With its 8.4-meter mirror and 3.2 gigapixel camera (making it the biggest digital camera in the world), the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) is a project that is defined by superlatives. Its mission? To extend the boundaries of the visible universe but also to tirelessly survey and map the universe for the next 10 years from the observatory on the summit of Cerro Pachón in Chile.

The LSST: the product of expertise from all over the world

To achieve its mission, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope will photograph the entire sky several times each week, allowing it to catalogue changes and measure the movement of the celestial bodies. Its astronomical surveys will contribute to studies designed to elucidate the structure and evolution of the Solar System and Milky Way. The findings will also be applied in various research projects dedicated to unlocking the mysteries of dark matter and dark energy.

Coordinated by the USA, the project has a budget of some USD 675 million (approximately EUR 600 million). Almost twenty countries will contribute to analysis of results with inputs from research laboratories from all around the world. Alongside the United States and Chile, France is playing an active part in the construction of the telescope through the French National Institute of Nuclear and Particle Physics (IN2P3).

Precision engineering in the service of astronomy

The telescope is installed on the 2,680 meter-high summit of Cerro Pachón, a site chosen for its very low levels of atmospheric and luminous interference. It is housed in a dome that is 30 meters in diameter and 17 meters high. The dome is fully motorised, so that the telescope can be rotated to successively point in all possible directions.

The telescope itself consists of three main elements. The first of these is the mount with which the telescope is precisely positioned in preparation for observations. Then there is the optical element, which is made up of three curved, aspherical mirrors, the largest of which has a diameter of more than 8 meters. Finally, there is the digital camera, which is one of the project’s centrepieces.

This camera is built around a 3.2 billion pixel digital sensor that is chilled to -100°C. This is sensitive to a particularly broad range of light, from near ultraviolet to near infrared, so that photometric measurements can be carried out across the entire spectrum. Finally, the camera incorporates a system of optic filters that enable users to select the fraction of the light spectrum that they wish to observe.

Fast-action optical filter changer

All astronomical survey telescopes incorporate a filter changer but most of the systems currently in use are too slow to meet the ambitious performance requirements of the LSST, demanding changeover 15 times faster than that of other instruments of a similar size.

A team of five French laboratories therefore collaborated in the development of a robotic system capable of placing a new filter over the imaging camera in only a few minutes. In meeting this challenge, the team had to deal with major technical constraints, starting with the integration of the automatic filter changer, as all of its components had to be housed in the body of the camera. And there it must remain perfectly stable, even in the event of a strong earthquake.

The team designed a device capable of handling the extremely costly filters – each with a diameter of 75 cm and weighing almost 40 kg – with an accuracy of a tenth of a millimetre. The centre piece of the device is a carousel that can be loaded with up to five filters and present one of them for use in less than 20 seconds. In addition, there is an automatic mechanism for loading/unloading a filter onto the camera and another mechanism for loading filters within the camera. Together, these three elements go to make up the automatic filter changer.

Compactness, reliability, support

It is in this context that the French National Institute of Nuclear and Particle Physics (LPNHE) sought expert support from MDP – maxon France. The online configurator and associated technical documentation posted on the maxon website served as a starting point for identifying the initial components suitable for integration in the system.

In the course of further exchanges, the suitability of solutions from MDP – maxon France was validated, and the use of the same supplier for the motor/controller combination meant that there would be no compatibility issues. For example, the carousel and the automatic filter changer use maxon EC40/GP42 and RE40/GP52C drive motors along with an EPOS2 70/10 modular digital positioning controller.

Among the various criteria adopted by the teams working on the LSST were the compactness of the components, motors, gearheads and controllers – an essential factor as these had to integrated in the heart of the camera – combined with complete reliability. Indeed, the filter changer must be able to function continuously, with maintenance limited to a period of 2 weeks every 2 years when operation of the telescope is interrupted for re-aluminisation of its mirrors.

Multi-faceted collaboration

The demanding nature of the work carried out on the optical filter changer reflects the ambition of the project and gives some idea of the extent of collaboration required among the various stakeholders in the LSST. For its part, maxon is delighted that its online configurator, its motors, and its electronic systems have contributed to the successful realisation of such a technical and scientific challenge!.

For more information contact maxon motor Australia tel. +61 2 9457 7477.

MND New Zealand announced as official charity of Emirates Team New Zealand.

Emirates Team New Zealand are to partner with MND New Zealand (the Motor Neurone Disease Association of New Zealand) as the official charity of the Team for the 36th America’s Cup.

Emirates Team New Zealand June 18, 2019.

Motor Neurone Disease (MND) causes the muscles that enable us to move, speak, swallow and breathe to gradually stop working. New Zealand has the highest known rate of MND in the world, with an average of 2 people diagnosed each week and well over 300 people living with the condition.

Emirates Team New Zealand have first-hand experience witnessing the devastation of MND through team mate and former Emirates Team New Zealand Director and current Director of America’s Cup Event Ltd (ACE) Greg Horton.

“Greg has been and continues to be an undeniable inspiration to the team while fighting MND” said Emirates Team New Zealand CEO Grant Dalton.

“Whilst the disease is having a devastating effect on him physically he has always remained so strong and optimistic despite his personal hardship, he contributed to our success in winning the Cup in Bermuda, and he still manages to undertake his vital role towards the planning for the 36th America’s Cup in 2021.”

Greg is also a member of the National Council of the not-for-profit charity MND New Zealand which supports people living with MND, their family and carers and health professionals to enable them to have the best quality of life possible.

“MND New Zealand is a vital part of the support network for those with MND and their families.   Emirates Team New Zealand put its hand up early after my diagnosis with team members offering support to me and my family in any way possible, and it is great to formalise a broader support basis today with Emirates Team New Zealand coming on board as our charity partner.” explained Horton.

MND New Zealand General Manager Carl Sunderland says it is a huge honour to be the Official Charity of Emirates Team New Zealand.

“We rely almost completely on the generosity of the New Zealand community to continue to provide free, personalised support to people living with MND, their carers and families and this partnership will help raise awareness of this devastating disease and the vital work we do.”

MND New Zealand also proudly funds vital research at the Centre for Brain Research at the University of Auckland and supports the latest genetics study led by Dr. Emma Scotter.

“MND New Zealand. Together with the Royal Society of NZ and several generous kiwi organisations and families, fund our research into the causes and possible cures of MND. Although the brain tissues of New Zealanders who die from MND show the expected signs of the disease, our research has uncovered a higher rate of MND in New Zealand than in the rest of the world. Our next step is a nationwide genetics study, also supported by MND New Zealand, to determine if our high rates relate to unique genetic factors in New Zealanders.” Said Dr Scotter.

As part of its support for MND New Zealand, Emirates Team New Zealand is giving MND New Zealand a full immersion day at Emirates Team New Zealand as an auction item to be auctioned off at The Grocery Charity Ball in September.

“Through Greg you can see the amazing work MND New Zealand do for the 300+ New Zealanders that are living with MND so we are really proud to be supporting them and everything they do” concluded Grant Dalton.

To make a donation to help MND New Zealand, please go to www.mnd.org.nz

For further information on DC motors for use in underwater and extreme environments please contact maxon motor Australia tel. +61 2 9457 7477.

Hollow shaft right angle brushless DC gearmotor

New industrial series IP65 hollow shaft right angle gearmotor.

Featuring high power density this 60mm diameter 400W 48V brushless DC motor and right angle helical bevel gear combination can deliver 25Nm of torque. Loads can be mounted traditionally via keyway or coupling and also through-shaft clamp collar fittings can be used. The brushless DC motor’s rear cable entry housing contains a 5000cpt 3 channel encoder and a DC holding brake for safety critical power failure load holding. Two different 48V windings allow for high speed and low current preferences making control selection easy and cost effective. All surfaces are gasketed, all bearings are rubber sealed and cables are grommeted for industrial operation in harsh environments making the drive particularly suitable for oil and gas, mining and agriculture applications.

For more information please contact maxon motor Australia tel. + 61 2 9457 7477.

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