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DC motors in blood analysis machines

High-tech machines analyse human blood samples and detect coagulation disorders. Maxon motor France supplies the DC drives as well as builds entire conveyor modules especially for a customer.

Analysis devices in laboratories and hospitals run 24/7, autonomously pipetting samples to deliver quick results. Such industrial automation equipment must work with high accuracy and reliability. This in turn places high demands on all components of the machines.

Stago is a French company that specialises in analysis instruments for haemostasis diagnostics (for testing blood clotting). Maxon DC motors are found in Stago’s StarMax machine. A fully automated analysis system, the StarMax is equipped with a three-axes robot with space for 215 samples and 1,000 test containers. Working autonomously the machine checks results, compares them and monitors the processes.

There are several varieties of maxon’s brushed A-max DC motor combined with planetary gearheads, that are used for the movements of the rack. With varying diameters between 16 and 26mm, these DC motors were selected for being highly dynamic and easy to control. The DC motors have an ironless rotor and are manufactured autonomously giving them an attractive price-performance ratio.

For more information on applications involving mechatronics and automation please contact maxon motor Australia tel. +61 2 9457 7477.

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Maxon’s A-max DC motor and GP22 planetary gearhead © maxon motor

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The analysis system STAR Max. © Stago

 

 

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New! Maxon release the first sterilisable encoder.

maxon motor have unveiled the first sterilisable encoder for brushless DC motors. This will create many opportunities for advances in medical technology.

The first steam sterilisable encoder has been released by maxon motor. The ENX EASY is available in two versions, as an incremental (1024 CPT) and an absolute version (4096 CPT). It can be integrated into suitable motors without increasing the length. The encoder has allowed maxon to create the first sterilisable drive system with brushless DC motor, gearhead and integrated encoder.

Ideal for demanding medical / surgical applications where speed and positioning control tasks are performed. Available with ball bearings or in a ceramic version. The encoder delivers high speeds, extremely precise commutation, low vibration and reduction of heat build-up. To optimise costs and space restrictions, the encoder is integrated in the brushless DC motor.

For more information please contact maxon motor Australia tel. +61 2 9457 7477.

DC motors in medical technology.

The new edition of maxon motor’s magazine, driven, focuses on developments in the medical industry.

Surgeon’s tools, robotics and machines used in medical technology are developing at a fast pace. The latest maxon motor magazine looks at hand held surgeon tools, robotic devices, measuring tools and machines to aid faster patient recovery times, less invasive procedures and pin-point precision surgery.

Published two times a year in English, Chinese and German, maxon’s magazine is available free of charge. For more information visit magazine.maxonmotor.com or for even more blogs, stories and videos visit maxon motor’s drive.tech site.

DC motors for ROV and subsea actuators.

The new maxon motor magazine delves into the fascinating use of motors in all sorts of equipment used at the bottom of the sea.

Tethered by umbilicals or autonomously controlled, robots, ROV’s and subsea mechanisms use DC motors for positioning, gripping and propelling tasks. The motors need to be manufactured to suit the harshest operating environments and extreme pressure. Learn how design engineers create products for subsea applications and see them in use.

Also in the upcoming edition maxon motor experts cover the important features to look for in a DC motor controller and give a detailed comparison between brushed and brushless DC motors.

Contact maxon motor Australia for your copy. Ph: +61 2 9457 7477.

 

maxon DC motors in a climbing robot on the Sydney Harbour Bridge.

The iconic Sydney Harbour Bridge has 7.2km of confined tunnels in its arches. A climbing robot, fitted with maxon DC motors, has been developed to access areas deemed too unsafe for workers, sending real time information to Engineers to evaluate disrepair and damage.

The climbing robot has magnetic feet and uses a sensor to create a map of the dim and narrow tunnels. This gives the robot the ability to move through the tunnels climbing up and down walls and scaling drop-offs up to 1.5 meters.

The robot uses six of the Maxon DCX custom motor configurations. They are used to peel the magnets from the surface, one for each magnet, three in each foot. maxon DCX series of DC motors are a robotically manufactured, online configurable motor, gearhead and encoder combination.

Developed by the University of Technology Sydney and Roads & Maritime Services over a five-year period, the robot was able to access a section of the bridge that was too dangerous for workers and where paintwork hadn’t been updated since 1932. The climbing robot has negated the need to send workers down 30cm hatches that appear roughly every six meters along the Bridge. The risk of asphyxiation, poor air quality, getting stuck inside the Bridge and the need for emergency rescue are drastically reduced if not negated by using the climbing robot.

The climbing robot has the potential to access dangerous structures where workers would otherwise risk their lives to inspect or maintain.

For more information on DC motors and Drives robotic applications please contact maxon motor Australia on Tel. +61 2 9457 7477.

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The maxon motors used in the climbing robot on the Sydney Harbour Bridge © 2016 maxon motor

 

 

The bionic model.

Rebekah Marine walked the runway at New York Fashion Week. What’s so inspiring is that Rebekah was the first to do so wearing her prosthetic i-limb.

It’s not every day you see a model with a bionic arm sashay down the runway at New York Fashion Week. But that’s exactly what Rebekah Marine, 28, did. Born without a right forearm she has refused to let this hold her back. Challenging stereotypes and proudly wearing her prosthetic, the i-limb quantum, Rebekah also publicly appeals for more tolerance in the modelling industry.

The groundbreaking limb was made by British Manufacturer Touch Bionics. The strong, powerful yet smooth movements in the prosthetic feature maxon DC motors and planetary gearheads. It is the first and only upper-limb prosthesis that enables the user to change grips by performing a simple gesture. This control is automated and allows for the change between the grip by moving the i-limb quantum in one of 4 pre-programmed directions.

For more information please contact Tel. + 61 2 9457 7477.

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The I-limb quantum, by Touch Bionics.

How many DC motors can be found in Romeo?

Win a Sphero Ollie by answering this quiz question in maxon motor’s drive magazine.

Tough and Smart, the Sphero Ollie is a water resistant, shock proof, app driven robot that delivers extreme fun. Reaching 22.5kph Ollie can do hundreds of tricks and at up to 30m away via a Bluetooth connection. maxon motor is giving away 3 of these robots and all you have to do is read the latest edition of maxon motor’s driven magazine. Not that this is a chore! The latest edition features articles from all over the world that exhibit the latest robotics and automation technologies. Dr Urs Kafader tutors us on controlling multiple motor axis in robotics covering both the mechanical aspects and motor control. The maxon motor magazine for tablet format contains interactive multimedia features and can be found on the Apple App Store and Google Play.

For more information please contact a sales engineer Tel. +61 2 9457 7477.

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Sphero Ollie.

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