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Burling and Tuke on top of the world again.

After 5 days of racing in their home waters in Auckland Peter Burling and Blair Tuke won their fifth 49er World Championship.

A difficult week for the fleets racing at the 49er Worlds due to mixed sailing conditions and a tense last day for Peter Burling and Blair Tuke that started with a gear failure causing them to pull out of the opening race, followed by a third place in the next race.

At the start of the medal race Burling and Tuke were eight points clear, needing to finish within four places of the second placed German team also intent on winning the championship. The drama peaked when Peter Burling slipped off the back of the boat and into the water when tacking on the first upwind leg of the medal race, plunging the New Zealand pair to the back of the fleet.

The Kiwi – duo though fought their way back to finish fourth in the Medal Race and to win the gold medal by six points overall.

“It’s definitely the top, no doubt,” Tuke said when reflecting on a fifth world title. “We said going into it that racing a world champs on your home waters would be right up there with the Olympics. It feels pretty good.

“It always feels good when you do it in that fashion, when it comes down to the wire as well. We would have liked to have won by more but you take it any way you can. We’re really proud that we came back in the end there.”

“It was a bit annoying,” an understated Burling said of his swim in the medal race. “It was the same thing we did in the first race when we snapped the tiller extension. It was really choppy out there and hard to get the timing quite right.”

Tuke added: “It certainly wasn’t part of the plan. We would have ideally sailed a bit better in the morning and wrapped it up but, whichever way we get it, we’re pretty happy and we knew that if it came down to this we would be able to step up. To do it in front of our friends, family and supporters is very, very special.”

Peter Burling and Blair Tuke have an intense schedule ahead as they will combine their Olympic campaign with their America’s Cup commitments.

With little time to reflect on today’s win, tomorrow they’ll be back at work with Emirates Team New Zealand sailing the teams AC75 back on the very same waters of their latest world beating accomplishment.

maxon motor Australia is an Official Supplier to Emirates Team New Zealand. We follow the progress of their journey as Defender in the 36th America’s Cup campaign, March 2021.

maxon motor Australia tel. +61 2 9457 7477.

Visit maxon at the SPS Exhibition in Nuremburg, Germany

New products are revealed by maxon at the 30th SPS Exhibition in Nuremburg, from November 26 – 28, 2019. Visit maxon in hall 1, booth 224.

Maxon are excited to reveal a new development by way of a powerful, modular compact drive made especially for applications in industrial and logistics automation. Introducing the IDX drive. It combines a formidable, brushless EC-i motor and an EPOS4 positioning controller, which can be complemented with a maxon planetary gearhead where required. This drive stands out for its high efficiency, maintenance-free components, and a high-quality industrial housing with IP65 protection. It also has configurable digital and analog inputs and outputs. Intuitive software enables easy commissioning and integration in master systems. The new IDX drive will be formally released at a special ceremony at the maxon booth – be there at 4pm on Wednesday, November 27th to be a part of the official unveiling.

Also showcased is the new EPOS4 DC motor controller, now available in a Micro version. As the name suggests, the benefits of these motion controllers are their small size and attractive pricing. This makes the maxon EPOS4 Micro 24/5 particularly interesting for robotics applications where space is at a premium, as well as cost-sensitive multi-axis applications. At the maxon booth you can get a detailed look at the small motion controllers.

Across all three days, maxon experts will stand ready to talk about innovative aerospace and medical applications, share their expertise, and discuss potential solutions.

In addition maxon will have a special guest, Biorobotics expert Kamilo Melo, who will be showing the robotic snake he developed. With 16 maxon DC motors and a specific software, it moves just like one of its natural counterparts. Come along and see the snake at the maxon booth!

Please contact the maxon media office for more information media@maxongroup.com.

maxon motor Australia tel. +61 2 9457 7477.

New driven out now!

maxon Groups current edition of driven, the in-house magazine that explores drive technology, focuses on the impact digitisation and automisation have on the workplace, and what exactly is meant by a Smart Factory.

Home automation systems where appliances are managed remotely and through a single touchpoint, are becoming more commonplace and a great example of digitisation in the home. In companies though, how will Industry 4.0, the Internet of Things and artificial intelligence affect employment? Will people be replaced by automisation and robotic systems? Readers will learn what is behind the terms used in connection with the smart factory and why some technologies are taking longer to reach fruition than initially expected.

In other news, the editorial staff of driven visited an exoskeleton team preparing for the Cybathlon, the second part to the article on “Inductance in iron-core DC motors” is released and the Ceramic Department within maxon Group gets a closer look.

Available free of charge. driven magazine is published bi-annually in three languages and is full of interesting reports, interviews, and news from the world of drive technology. The current issue is available online or can be ordered in print.

Please contact the maxon media office for more information.

media@maxongroup.com or maxon motor Australia tel. +61 2 9457 7477.

Roger Frigola from Emirates Team New Zealand inspires maxon.

Roger Frigola, Optimisation Engineer at Emirates Team New Zealand, presented to the maxon global Group at their annual management meeting in Brunnen, Switzerland on the 18 September, 2019.

maxon Group were delighted to welcome Roger Frigola (MSc Aerospace Engineering and PhD Artificial Intelligence) from Emirates Team New Zealand at their annual management meeting. In their capacity as Official Supplier to Emirates Team New Zealand, maxon Group received insight into the process and technicalities of designing the AC75 Class yacht. For the current America’s Cup campaign, the design process began in 2018 with the publication of the Class Rule that states specific design parameters set out by the Deed of Gift. Roger has been involved in the America’s Cup since 2014 and has experience in the McLaren F1, Ferrari F1, Porsche Le Mans and Red Bull F1 Motorsports.

Emirates Team New Zealand: Current Defenders of the America’s Cup

The America’s Cup is the world’s oldest trophy in international sport, captivating the world since its inception in 1851. Emirates Team New Zealand are three times winner, current Defenders of the America’s Cup and the first non-American competitor to successfully defend the trophy. It would appear to remain that if you won the America’s Cup you would stay with the same type of boat. This isn’t the case for Emirates Team New Zealand, who created a New Class of Yacht – the AC75. Innovation is key and the entire concept was proven only through use of a simulator without any prototypes. The Challengers have developed smaller boats and tested them, but Emirates Team New Zealand placed their trust in the simulation and the team of people working behind the scenes.

For the new AC75 Class of Yacht, Emirates Team New Zealand designed the system that all the teams use to raise and lower the foils. The Design & Engineering Team also work with HP using 3-D printed components for the Yacht.

The team

A support team of more than 150 people contribute expertise from across many disciplines. There is the crew of 11 sailors (8 of those are grinders) and around 25 people within the design and engineering team including naval architects, structural and mechanical engineers, simulators and software developers. Then there is the shore people, boat builders, marketing, media, lawyers, accounting, physiotherapists, trainers and cooks.

AC36: a new rule

One method of gathering data for the performance of the Yacht and the Sailors was to test through physical experiments in wind tunnels or towing tanks. However this America’s Cup campaign is the first to prohibit any experimental testing in wind tunnels or towing tanks. This new concept and Yacht design has been modelled on physics with design by optimisation. The results of the simulation data were then compared to the actual boat reactions with testing on and off the water looking closely at safety issues, strains, stress loads etc. The Computational fluid dynamics (the examination of fluid flow in accordance with its physical properties such as velocity, pressure, temperature, density and viscosity) were modelled on the conditions of a wind tunnel. The amount of data that is collected is so large it’s stored across 8 HP desktop machines.

The members of the Design & Engineering Team spend the majority of their time on the Chase Boat, analysing real-time data from the AC75 yacht test runs. The thousands of gigabytes per day that are captured are compared against the computational physics from the simulation data and used in the build of the second boat that will sail in the America’s Cup.

The America’s Cup World Series, Sardinia, April 2020

All teams will meet for the first time between April 23-26, 2020 with the America’s Cup World Series kicking off in Cagliari, Sardinia. The fearlessness with adopting innovation and confidence placed in the simulation, combined with the knowledge, skills and enthusiasm of Emirates Team New Zealand – not to mention the backing from Sponsors, Official Suppliers and Supporters – advocate strongly the retention of Current Defender of the America’s Cup. The prowess of the AC75’s will be on full display and we eagerly await seeing the boat racing to its full potential.

maxon motor Australia is an Official Supplier to Emirates Team New Zealand. We follow the progress of their journey as Defender in the 36th America’s Cup campaign, to be held in Auckland, New Zealand in March 2021.

maxon motor Australia | tel. +61 2 9457 7477.

Sensorless control of brushless motors.

Many applications would benefit from a brushless motor without a sensor. A method developed by maxon is now setting new standards for precision and reliability.

Driving a brushless motor requires control electronics for precise commutation. However, this is possible only if the control electronics “know” the exact position of the rotor at all times. Traditionally, this information was provided by sensors, e.g. Hall sensors, installed inside the motor. But it can be done differently. Sensorless control methods use current and voltage information from the motor to determine the rotor position. The motor speed can then be derived from changes in the rotor position, and this information can be used for speed control. More advanced sensorless control methods can even control the current (torque) and the position. Leaving out the sensors has a range of benefits, such a lower cost and space savings, because cables, connectors, and sensitive electronic circuits become unnecessary.

Sensorless controllers by maxon use three basic principles that are adapted specifically to maxon BLDC motors.

Principle 1: EMF method with zero crossing

The EMF method with determination of the zero crossing uses induced voltage (or EMF) in the non-powered phase during block commutation. The zero crossing happens in the middle of the commutation interval (fig. 1). The time delay to the next commutation point can be estimated from the preceding commutation steps.

The EMF method with zero crossing works only when the speed is high enough, because EMF becomes zero at standstill. Starting up the motor requires a special process, similar to step motor control, and must be configured separately. True sensorless commutation is possible only with motor speeds of 500–1000 rpm and up. The commutation step frequency is used for speed control. The limited feedback information puts some constraints on the motor dynamics, although this can be improved by integrating estimation methods into the control algorithm (observer, Kalman filter, etc.). The EMF method with zero crossing also has a range of benefits: It works for all brushless motor models, and it’s robust and cost-effective. The approach is used in many standard products, such as the maxon ESCON Module 50/4 EC-S.

Principle 2: Observer-based EMF method

Observer or model-based EMF methods use information about the motor current to determine rotor position and speed. The model-based approach yields a much higher resolution of the rotor position. This enables sinusoidal commutation (or FOC, field-oriented control), with all its benefits: Higher efficiency, lower heat generation, less vibration and noise. However, the observer-based EMF method also requires a minimum speed of several 100 rpm to function properly.

Principle 3: Magnetic anisotropy methods

Methods based on magnetic anisotropy deduce the rotor position from the motor inductance, which is minimal when the magnetic flows of the rotor and the stator are in parallel in the magnetic return (fig. 2). Measurement is achieved by means of brief current pulses, which do not cause the motor to move. Unlike EMF-based methods, this method also works at standstill or very low speeds, and it permits sinusoidal commutation. The measured signals are highly dependent on the motor type. The rotor position is determined in a model of the motor, which needs to be parameterised and adapted for each motor. Controllers based on magnetic anisotropy are therefore highly specific products – “plug and play” is not an option. The computation effort required for evaluating the rotor position also limits the maximum speed.

Why sensorless control?

In price-sensitive applications, the use of sensorless motors may reduce the cost. Hall sensors, encoders, cables, and connectors become unnecessary. Typical applications in this field are fans, pumps, scanners, mills, drills, and other fast-turning applications with a relatively modest control performance that do not require a tightly controlled start-up. For high quantities, a customised version of the EMF-based controller makes sense.

Cost optimisation for high control performance

Cost savings aren’t the only reason to choose sensorless control. Applications like door drives or bike drives require high controller performance. Jerk-free motor control from zero rpm is important, as are high dynamics and sinusoidal commutation for noise avoidance. All this needs to be realised without using an expensive encoder. Over the last few years, high-quality sensorless controllers based on the anisotropy method have become established, including maxon’s new High Performance Sensorless Control (HPSC, see below). However, the engineering effort required for adapting the model parameters can only be justified for quantities upward of a few hundred.

Rough ambient conditions

Sensorless control may also be required in situations where vulnerable sensor electronics need to be avoided in a motor. Examples include applications in very high or low ambient temperatures, cleaning and sterilisation in medical technology, or ionising radiation in space, nuclear facilities, or medical settings. The lower number of motor connectors also makes integration easier if space is limited.

The required control quality depends on the application. Which sensorless method fits best must be decided on a case by case basis. For example, hand-held dental tools for drilling or grinding need high speeds, while lower speeds and controlled torque are required for fixing screws in surgery.

Conclusion

There are three main reasons for choosing sensorless control: Cost savings, space savings, and operation in environments unfavorable to sensors. The EMF method with zero crossing determination is widespread in cost-sensitive applications that run at high speeds. Sensorless control from standstill and at low speeds requires more advanced methods. The implementation effort is greater and includes modelling and parameterisation. Cost savings are secondary. Field-oriented control yields a higher efficiency, less heat build-up, and a lower vibration and noise level. All these are advantages that come to bear especially in hand-held medical devices.

For further information please contact maxon motor Australia tel. +61 2 9457 7477.

 

maxon sensorless controllers

The HPSC Module 24/5 (High Performance Sensorless Control) is a new development from maxon, it is a platform of hardware and customer-specific software. HPSC is always a customised solution and therefore not a catalogue product.

What’s special about this development: At standstill and at low speeds, magnetic anisotropy-based control technology is used first (principle 3). Then, when the speed is higher, a smooth transition to an observer-based EMF method (principle 2) follows. The module’s firmware is customised for every drive system. In a special tuning process, more than 120 parameters are automatically adjusted to each motor’s “fingerprint.” An example of the use of HPSC is the hand-held medical tool developed recently by maxon.

The ESCON Module 50/4 EC-S is the only sensorless controller from maxon that is listed in the product catalogue (block commutation with EMF method and zero crossing determination). The Sensorless Controller 24/1 is an alternative for the smallest EC motors (up to about 10 mm diameter). However, it is not listed in the catalogue or the e-shop.

 

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A mechatronic orthosis glove, for restoring mobility to the hand after an accident or stroke.

A specially developed glove with maxon DC motors provides strength and mobility to the wearer.

Two medical engineers have created a glove that restores mobility to the wearer’s fingers. The mechatronic orthosis, called the exomotion® hand one, is in its testing phase and available soon to the market. The exomotion® hand one is worn like a glove and consists of custom-fitted exo-finger mechanics, a supporting forearm splint, a sensor, a control unit, and four miniature drives that provide the power to open or close the wearer’s fingers. Six types of grip are available, restoring freedom of movement that may have  been lost as a result of accident, stroke or degenerative disease.

The hand orthosis was developed by Dominik Hepp and Tobias Knobloch, both medical engineers. They first met in university, where they both focused on this issue and founded start-up company HKK Bionics, in 2017. The two men hope to close a gap with their development: “We offer patients with fully or partially paralysed hands an aid than helps them to perform everyday tasks on their own again,” explains Dominik Hepp. Simple tasks like cooking, carrying shopping bags and opening packages will soon become part of the wearer’s daily routine again. “With an aid that is suitable for everyday use, these people can regain a degree of independence in their daily lives.”

The development of engineering medical prototypes is not without its challenges. The orthosis is intended to be worn all day long therefore it needed to be robust, high-performing and lightweight. After developing the initial prototype, the main focus was on making everything smaller, including finding suitable new components. “That was a real challenge, since we couldn’t accept any compromise in terms of stability or performance,” says Dominik Hepp. To solve this problem, the two designers collaborated with suppliers to develop special components. At the core of the hand orthosis are four customised EC motors from maxon. These requirement was not only small in size and powerful, also the DC motors had to guarantee years of service with hundreds of thousands of operating cycles. The brushless micromotors deliver the necessary grip strength and are controlled via sensors that respond to still-intact muscles, a principle that is also found in prosthetic arms.

2019 is a year of practical trials for HKK Bionics, as the product goes through extensive testing before it is approved and becomes available on the market. “We want to make the exomotion® hand one accessible to as many patients as possible. That’s why we are pursuing collaborative partnerships with selected medical supply stores while expanding our network to include doctors and therapists,” explains Dominik Hepp. For the two young businessmen, this is an exciting challenge at the interface between technology and human beings. “It’s great to see that with our experience, plenty of creativity, and some tinkering around, we can contribute to improving the quality of patients’ lives.”

For further information please contact maxon motor Australia tel. +61 2 9457 7477.

Swiss racer Sébastien Buemi joins maxon Group as an Ambassador.

Drive specialist maxon and Swiss car racer Sébastien Buemi team up to share their passion for precision, efficiency and e-mobility.

Racer Sébastien Buemi knows what precision and efficiency are. After all, the former F1 driver has already won 13 races in the new Formula E and was the world champion in 2016. Being fast is not enough to be a front runner in this fully electric race series, a driver must also be efficient and energetic, or the battery will be empty before he reaches the finish line. That’s why Sébastien Buemi is a perfect match for maxon, whose high-end electric motors can be found not just in Mars rovers, but also in the Ad-Blue injection systems used in Formula 1 race cars.

maxon is collaborating with Sébastien Buemi and the parties signed the contract on September 9th. To celebrate the occasion, Buemi visited maxon headquarters in Sachslen, Switzerland to tour the company and meet the maxon team. Buemi was impressed with the cleanrooms and the tiny drives with a diameter of only four millimeters.

When the Formula E starts its sixth season on November 22nd, the Swiss collaboration will be represented by the maxon logo on Buemi’s racing suit. Buemi is also an ambassador for maxon. He says: “I’m proud of working with a Swiss high-tech company and being part of the maxon family.” The joy is mutual. CEO Eugen Elmiger says, “Sébastien and the Formula E in general are a great match for maxon. After all, we are increasingly becoming a systems provider, and the e-mobility market is particularly interesting in this regard.”

For further information please contact maxon’s media office, telephone +41 41 662 43 81 or email media@maxongroup.com

Mechatronic systems for small collaborative robots

Designing in the right DC motor and mechatronic drive system for a small precision device can incite challenges on many levels.

With the development and increase of collaborative robots, there has become a need for a wide variety of grippers and end effectors in general. One of the more challenging applications is for automated gauging and measurement of small parts. Such a device must provide high-resolution positioning with resolutions as low as 2.5 micrometers that can be continually available to decision-making software in automation applications. This is why New Scale Robotics (NSR), a Division of New Scale Technologies decided to design and manufacture one of their latest grippers.

Built for the smallest collaborative robots, the NSR-PG-10-20, Precision Parallel Gripper, is a mechatronic system that integrates motor, sensors, precision bearing guides, drive, and control electronics, along with embedded firmware for automation, into one device. During the design process, NSR decided that the gripper had to offer plug-and-play integration that could be installed in minutes to Universal Robotics (UR) line of small cobots. The NSR-PG-10-20 offers users the smallest size and mass with the highest precision. All power and control circuitry is located through the robot tool port and slip rings so that no external cable or electronics boards are required. To install the gripper, simply mount it to the UR robot tool flange and connect the single cable to the UR tool I/O port. Motion commands are received through the robot’s 8-pin tool I/O interface. No external wires or separate electronics are needed, which allows for full 360-degree or infinite rotation of the UR robot wrist joint without cable interference.

The Precision Parallel Gripper incorporates an internal absolute position sensor specifically for automated metrology applications offering high precision for intricate small part handling, measurement, sorting, and assembly. The grippers had to provide fast, precise movements repeatedly over a long life cycle.

Precision Motion Control

During the design process, NSR researched the needs of their Precision Parallel Gripper and selected the EC-20 Flat brushless DC motor (BLDC) designed and manufactured by maxon. This motor offers up to five winding types as well as built-in encoders. Multiple power outputs are available, and the motors provide high stability and quiet operation. The motors were primarily selected because of their extremely small mass of only 15 grams as well as their high continuous torque of 3.75 mN-m. The motors’ excellent torque-to-mass ratio means that the NSR-PG-10-20 can achieve an adjustable gripping force of ±3 to 10 N while using a modest gear ratio of 16:1. The gripper incorporates a symmetric timing belt drive with a range of 20 mm. Plus, the operational voltage, current, and torque were a good match with the internal robot power supply.

The brushless DC rotary motor drives gear reduction to a timing belt that converts rotation to linear motion. A separate angle sensor is used to measure the motor shaft angle, while separate digital electronics are used to generate the three-phase drive current needed for operation. This mechanism provides the linear motion necessary to open and close the gripper fingers used to grab and release small parts. Gripper fingers are able to grip from the outside or inside of the part depending on the application. Through the use of the embedded sensor mentioned above, the linear part measurement resolution of the gripper is 2.5 micrometers. The open/close speed of the gripper is 20 mm/second and the open/close range is 20 mm.

According to David Henderson, CEO of NSR, “The tricky parts of the design were maintaining the small size, height, and low mass of the gripper while providing closed-loop position and velocity characteristics. It was also a challenge to find a low power and current motor that allowed us to use the internal power on the robot.” maxon’s EC-20 Flat allowed NSR the leverage they needed to deliver the product their customers most needed — and still be easy to install and operate. The mechanical integration was the easiest part. The company used an EC-20 Flat without an angle sensor and instead provided their own external angle sensor for commutation. “In the future, we expect to extend our product range to include grippers with higher gripping forces — and correspondingly higher mass and power motors — longer gripping ranges, and embedded force sensors to improve force control,” Mr. Henderson said.

The gripper is equipped with interchangeable fingers. The NSR-PG ships with factory fingers installed so that users can get right to work. The gripper also provides teachable finger positions when used with Universal Robotics’ UR3, UR5, UR10 robots as well as the company’s latest line of eSeries Robots, the UR3e, UR5e, and UR10e robots. Manually move fingers to the desired position and set them using the teach pendant — a process familiar to anyone who has used a UR robot in teach mode. Position is repeatable to 0.01 mm. By setting finger open and close positions that match a user’s workpiece allows the user to minimise the finger motion (stroke) for each operation, saving time and energy. Overall, the NSR-PG-10-20 allows the user to automate repetitive, labor-intensive measurement and quality control tasks so that the UR cobot becomes a powerful tool for metrology applications.

Finding the right DC motor for such specific applications can be a daunting task. Having the availability of the latest technology in the smallest packaged DC motor has allowed NSR to fulfill their customer needs. maxon’s EC-20 Flat DC motor was a key component in the design and manufacture of the NSR-PG-10-20 Precision Parallel Gripper.

For more information: newscalerobotics.com or contact maxon motor Australia tel. +61 2 9457 7477.

Medtech development: miniature surgical robot with haptic technology

A start-up company in Hong Kong has developed an abdominal surgical robot with two small arms that unfold inside the abdomen and controlled by the surgeon using a control panel.

The start-up company NISI (HK) Limited is developing a miniature surgical robot that can be inserted though natural openings in the body and only unfolds inside the abdomen. To achieve this goal, the engineers are pushing components to their limits and beyond.

In the world of medtech, there are many astonishing new developments these days. The world of surgical robots could soon be disrupted: In summer 2018, the Hong Kong-based startup NISI announced that they have successfully performed a series of gynecological operations on live pigs. This may not sound like anything special at first, however: The essence is that the surgeons used a small robot that had been inserted rectally. This is a world’s first in medical history, according to the company.

NISI was founded in 2012 and works with the universities of Hong Kong and Cambridge to develop a robotic system that enables complex, minimal-invasive surgeries in the abdominal and pelvic area without leaving visible scars. “We want to become the world’s leading expert in non-invasive surgical robotic technology,” says Dr. Corinna Ockenfeld at NISI. The successful surgeries in the summer of 2018 have given the medtech start-up a lot of momentum. Initial surgeries on humans are planned for 2021.

The idea behind the NISI’s novel surgical system is as follows: The surgical robot is inserted through a natural orifice, usually the anus or the vagina. By doing so, only a small cut inside the body is necessary to get multiple robotic instruments inside the abdomen. Current systems require several incisions, one for each instrument. The new technology has obvious benefits: Less blood loss during surgery, less wound related complications, shorter recovery time for the patient, and no visible scars.

The robot itself has two small arms that unfold inside the abdomen and can be controlled by the surgeon using a control panel. The two robotic arms are directly controlled by micromotors from maxon and have up to eight degrees of freedom. The system also has a high-resolution 2D and 3D camera and delivers haptic feedback, so that the surgeon is able to feel what is happening at the other end and can work with even higher precision.

Bringing surgical robots to the next level requires more than outstanding technicians and engineers: Quality components are a key element. NISI is therefore testing various concepts and combinations of components. “We want to push the boundaries of medical and robotic technology,” says Dr. Corinna Ockenfeld. With regard to the motors, this requires an extremely small size and extremely high power density. “We are working closely with maxon and have a weekly exchange of information. We really appreciate the support we’ve received over the past years. The collaboration with maxon is highly productive and extremely valuable for both sides.”

The prototypes of the NISI surgical robotic system currently use various brushless DC motors from the EC series, with diameters ranging from 4 to 8 millimeters, complemented by matching customised gearheads. Both partners are pushing the precision drives to their limits, sometimes running them outside the nominal specifications. However, the BLDC motors are customised for the application’s specific needs. They require high power density, must fulfil extremely strict quality standards and be sealed against body fluids. In the future, the drives will also be biocompatible.

The next steps are to make the entire system even smaller, to make the motors even more dynamic and to expand the working range of the robot. “We take care of every little detail and take innovative approaches to solving problems,” says Dr. Corinna Ockenfeld. Step by step, NISI is coming closer in fulfilling its vision of making non-invasive surgery without scars a commonplace reality.

For further information please contact maxon Australia tel. +61 2 9457 7477.

Changes to the maxon pancake motor gives more torque

maxon have modified their EC90 flat DC motor.

The EC90 flat (pancake) 400W DC motor has been upgraded to allow a continuous current of 14.9 A. The re-design of the connector to a mega-fit version is suitable for up to 23 A current and the cable cross-section changes from AWG 16 to AWG 14. The open rotor supports cooling during operation, which allows for greater continuous torques.

The flat design of the brushless EC flat motors makes them the perfect solution for many applications, particularly those requiring high torque and control electronics. The considered, simple design makes it possible to largely automate the manufacturing and this is reflected in the DC motors economical price.

maxons brushless EC90 pancake motors range from 9.2mm to 90mm, 0.2 to 90w. For further information please contact maxon Australia tel. +61 2 9457 7477.

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